image Smart AV Event Technology Predictions for 2017

How Agencies Implement Virtual Reality in Brand Campaigns

Oculus Rift

Within events the demand for virtual reality and augmented reality is growing . VR and AR, like social media enablement and interactive technology before it, will soon be a technology that visitors look for and expect. Within all industries and verticals, not just traditional gaming.

So how can agencies translate these trends for brand campaigns? We work on multiple brand VR campaigns as a technology partner, hardware specialist and facilitator of content testing and deployment. This provides insight into the cheapest, easiest and most effective ways of creating virtual campaigns. Whether this is within an event, exhibition, pop-up or in-store activation.

Whether you’re just starting out, or you already have multiple virtual reality campaigns but would like to explore an easier process, we talk you through how to make VR a no-brainer event choice.

Easy to use consumer-grade virtual reality hardware

The biggest benefit of virtual reality for brand campaigns is that you don’t have to invest in expensive technology. VR is one of the rare technologies (positioned towards a drifting trend) where the entire experience can be created using equipment purchased at a local hardware store.

Some of the hardware we’ve used to implement brand campaigns include:

Google Cardboard and Brand Campaigns

This device is a consumable, accessible technology choice for almost any budget. The benefit of the Google Cardboard is that it offers a simple viewer anyone can build or buy. This poses branding opportunities that are easily affordable. The Google Cardboard can easily be used as a the backbone for a fully-branded VR experience that can be paired with apps from Google Play.

Samsung VR and Events

The Samsung VR is one of the most accessible VR headsets for brand campaigns. Wireless, it makes the ideal vehicle for fluid event experiences. Samsung VR is much sleeker than its Oculus counterpart, which is often a requirement for leading brands. The Samsung smartphone used determines the visual experience, so the highest spec available is always recommended.

Below is a campaign using the Samsung VR where the content was filmed by the client to show off their innovative new car park design. This was then added to a Samsung handset to ‘plug and play’ into a Samsung VR. Not only did the visitor get a fully immersive virtual experience but this was live streamed to the huge LED screen, allowing the audience to join the journey.

virtual reality shared experience using LED

Oculus Rift and Brand Campaigns

The Oculus Rift is a great choice for higher-duty VR campaigns, remaining at a mid-to-high end entry point budget. This device has a slightly larger optical lens and faster refresh rate than the Samsung VR. Oculus is a tethered experience, which is a slight limitation (no walking around the stage bumping into things!). However, in terms of performance, Oculus Rift provides a buttery-soft refresh of content making the overall experience feel more realistic. Many of our clients have opted for the Oculus for this reason, despite the slightly higher price point.

Oculus Rift

The HTC VIVE

The VIVE is a newer headset already in high demand across the event and experiential space. The HTC, like Oculus Rift, has a 90Hz refresh rate and 360-degree head-tracking technology. This makes it ideal for the events space where you have just minutes to make an impact on visitors. This also reduces the motion sickness so often associated with lower price point devices.

Unlike some headers, HTC VIVE is built specifically for gaming. This makes it very much the go-to piece of technology within this field and it’s become the preferred platform for  a number of our official content partners and software developers.

How to do content creation for virtual reality campaigns

The Samsung 360 camera is a great example of how content can be created that will later translate into a VR brand campaign. For agencies and brands, content can be created on a Samsung 360 camera, added to a Samsung Galaxy S7 edge or similar and deployed to a Samsung VR headset without any external support required.

However 360-degree filming means that everything will be in shot – including the person holding the camera or the track being used to record. There are also technical elements that revolve around syncing cameras and stitching together the footage which could make an agency or content partner essential. Here’s a great read on the more technical elements of creating VR video content.

In two recent brand campaigns we worked on, the first created their VR content in-house by recording a walk-through of their innovative new designs. The second used footage that was custom-created by our content partner Uberact.

Shared experiences utilising LED and more

VR is not just about the experience happening from inside of the virtual reality headset. In an event setting you need a buzz built around the experience to gain buy-in from those nearby. Virtual reality should attract attention and make those queuing for a turn feel that the anticipation is worth the wait.

One of the ways our clients are doing this is by incorporating an additional layer of event technology. This could be a large LED screen where those walking by can watch the virtual world, or an interactive touchscreen mirroring the experience. Interactive touchscreens can also introduce qualifying questions for those about to take a turn. The recent Christmas campaign for Sainsburys we helped produce used VR to create a multi-user campaign. Visitors could take part in karaoke singing with virtual Snapchat filters added to their video before being streamed across social media.

Virtual reality and Brand Campaigns in 2017

If you’re ready to embrace virtual reality, or just an easier way of making it happen, our team would love to help support you. Our technology is designed to engineer your most creative vision into a reality. Reach out to discuss ideas with our team on info@smart-av.com

Related Posts
  • All
  • By Author
  • By Category
  • By Tag